Our Projects

Child & Youth Care

We believe that if a child is given a stable, loving, and supportive home environment they will flourish.

Unfortunately finding long term and successful placements for children who bear the effects of FASD or similar developmental disorders is far and few. We have made it our mission to create as far as possible a home environment within a structured environment that allows for control and supervision for children such as these.

Since 2014 Home of Hope has had a dream of evolving and moving from our “Cluster Foster Home Scheme” to a registered CYCC (Child and Youth Care Centre) We are very pleased to say that after a lot of hard work and help from our loyal Donors we were able to make that dream come true. In August 2018 Home of Hope was thrilled to announce that our application was approved and we are now running as a Child and Youth Care Centre. Our newly registered Child and Youth Care Centre allows for service rendering that is specifically tailored to meet the individual and unique needs we have identified in our children.

In looking after 20 children we aim to provide a holistic service that strives to equip our children to reach their unique potential regardless of where they come from or have experienced prior. We aim to keep their living environment as normal and stable as possible by providing long term care so that we can allow for them to become equipped and responsible members of society thus breaking the stigma that has been brought on by their disability.

We strive to teach our children basic responsibilities and practical life skills by giving them tasks and chores in and around their home, we teach social and emotional skills through various structured programmes and “in the moment teaching” in their everyday lives.
Our staff are handpicked with our family-culture in mind and we are proud of their willingness to learn together with our children and to go the extra mile in providing services in our ever developing care model.

Special Needs School

Amathemba means ‘our hope’ in the Xhosa language – one of South Africa’s 11 national languages. We opened Amathemba in 2010 to address the educational needs of children with Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD) who, as a result of cognitive, behavioural and emotional difficulties, cannot cope within the mainstream educational system. It is one of only a few schools in South Africa catering for the special needs of FASD and neurologically challenged children.

At Amathemba, our trained teachers, therapists and support staff provide language, literacy, numeracy, life skills and social skills from the core curriculum, which consists of different learning programs carefully chosen and tailored to our children’s specific needs.

From the outset, each child’s specific needs are identified in an individualised education plan (IEP), which is constantly adapted as the child develops. This individualised approach to learning ensures the child is prepared for either integration into a mainstream academically focused curriculum or a vocational curriculum with the aim of obtaining vocational employment.

The progress that the children attending Amathema School are making is truly remarkable. We are immensely proud of our students, some of whom were deemed to be uneducable by mainstream schools, but have shown steady improvement and, against all odds, are now reading and writing.

Every child with special needs should have the right to access education.

For more information on how to attend Amathemba School, contact education@homeofhope.co.za

Community Support Programmes

Mentoring and Parent Support

We understand that caregivers of children with FASD carry a huge physical and emotional burden and they often have no support in the challenge of raising these children.

In response, Home of Hope runs a Mentor and Parent Support Programme.

Support is given to the family by a mentor who visits the family on a regular basis and assists them in the following ways:

  • Giving them information on FASD and providing them with practical support and interventions to address the challenges they face with their children.
  • Information on FASD is given to extended family members as well as to the communities in which these children live.
  • The mentor works with caregivers, family members and service providers to find ways of changing the child’s environment to suit the child’s needs.
  • Families are helped to become strong and independent so that they can help other families in their communities whose children suffer from FASD and other neuro-developmental disorders.

This programme is a free service offered by Home of Hope and continues only with the kind support of donors and benefactors.

Every child with FASD deserves to be understood and properly cared for.

Professional Training

We increase awareness about FASD amongst professionals, such as teachers, nurses, social workers and prison officers, and educate them on identifying and working with people who suffer from the condition.

To date we have given training workshops to safety houses, foster homes, people who run prison programs, students in UCT and the University of Stellenbosch, hospital/clinic nurses and supervisors, legal aid criminal lawyers, community workers and school doctors/nurses.

The professional training consists of an overview of FASD and a presentation tailor made to the needs of the professional audience.

The Professional Training is a free service offered by Home of Hope and continues only with the kind support of donors and benefactors.

Working Care Farm

At Home of Hope, like any family with special needs children, we asked ourselves the question “What will happen to our children as adults?”

Sunhome farm provides a wide-range of agricultural based activities, linking the care of land, animals with that of physically and intellectually challenged young people. Within a therapeutic environment which is uniquely set up to ensure that they feel safe, valued, involved and dignified in meaningful accomplishments.

  • The gardens and agricultural activities are used as the foundation from which we support mental and physical health for vulnerable young people by incorporating daily farming activities.
  • Provides work opportunity for young people with special needs giving them a sense of self-worth and the opportunity to earn income.
  • Develop skills that can be utilised for work in the open labour market within the agriculture sector.
  • Functional learning.
  • Sustainable income ensuring the future of the project is sustainable.